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Find the Right Apartments for Rent Charlotte NC With This Guide

Charlotte is, undoubtedly, the largest city in North Carolina. Also, it is one of the fastest developing cities or urban areas in the United States of America. Over the years, the city has seen a huge increase in new people visiting and others coming to stay. This is because it is a hub or the center for business and artistic opportunities. Day in and out, the city draws and attracts people from all over the world. Also called the ‘Queen City,’ it is proudly the second biggest Banking Center in the United States of America. It is home to the biggest bank in the world which is ‘The Bank of America’. This is clear reason to make apartments for rent charlotte nc process to be quite confusing considering the number of people moving to work, school and start their lives in the city. Continue reading “Find the Right Apartments for Rent Charlotte NC With This Guide”

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Man drives car into NC restaurant after sitting family down at table

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Man intentionally drove car into NC restaurant as family ate inside

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By Janine Bowen, WRAL.com editor

Gaston County, N.C. — Two dead and several others are hurt after a car crashed into a Gaston County restaurant.

Authorities said a man, identified as Roger Self, walked into Surf and Turf Lodge in Bessemer City with his family, sat the family down, left the restaurant and then intentionally drove his car into the restaurant.

Gaston County Sheriff Alan Cloninger said Self’s daughter, Caitlyn Self, was killed as a result of the incident, which police confirmed was domestic-related. Authorities said Caitlyn Self was an off-duty sheriff’s deputy who had been with the Gaston County Sheriff’s Office for four years.

Authorities did not release the identity of the second deceased victim or say if the second victim was also related to Roger Self.

Authorities said several law enforcement officials were injured as a result of the crash.

Roger Self was in custody Sunday afternoon.

Authorities said there is no indication that drugs or alcohol played a role in the incident.

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Camping World Truck Series Charlotte 2018 NASCAR Race Info

NC Education Lottery 200

Charlotte Motor Speedway
NASCAR Camping World Truck Series Race #6 of 23 for the 2018 season
Race:Friday May 18, 2018 in Concord, NC
Title Sponsor: NC Education Lottery
Race Time: 8:30pm/et
Scheduled Green Flag (approx): 8:49pm/et

TELEVISION COVERAGE

Television Race Coverage: FoxSports1 – 8:30pm/et

RADIO COVERAGE

Motor Racing Network (motorracingnetwork.com) and SiriusXM Satellite NASCAR Channel 90 (siriusxm.com)

ONLINE STREAMING

FOX Sports GO. All NASCAR programming on FOX and FOX Sports 1 is streamed live through the FOX Sports GO app that provides live streaming video of FOX Sports content. Requires a participating TV provider. MRN Live Streaming SiriusXM Internet Radio is available via any internet connected device, with a subscription.

EVENT SCHEDULE

Times are local to the Track and subject to change

Thursday, May 17
12:00 PM 2:00 PM NCWTS HAULERS ENTER (EQUIPMENT UNLOAD)
1:30 PM 4:00 PM NASCAR CREDENTIALS OPEN
2:00 PM 5:00 PM NCWTS GARAGE OPEN

Friday, May 18
7:30 AM NCWTS GARAGE OPENS
8:00 AM NCWTS ROOKIE MEETING, SPOTTER MEETING, & RANDOM DRAWING
8:15 AM 8:30 AM NCWTS ROOKIE TRACK RIDE
9:05 AM 9:55 AM NCWTS 1ST PRACTICE
10:35 AM 11:25 AM NCWTS FINAL PRACTICE
3:00 PM 3:45 PM NCWTS AUTOGRAPH SESSION
4:40 PM NCWTS QUALIFYING (SINGLE VEHICLE / TWO ROUNDS)
5:45 PM NCWTS DRIVER / CREW CHIEF MEETING (MEDIA CENTER)
6:35 PM MENCS QUALIFYING (THREE LAPS, WITH PIT STOP – IMPOUND)
8:00 PM NCWTS DRIVER INTRODUCTIONS
8:30 PM NCWTS RACE (134 LAPS, 201 MILES)

NCWTS = NASCAR Camping World Truck Series
SUBJECT TO CHANGE

RACE INFORMATION

Stage Information:
Stage 1 – 40
Stage 2 – 80
Stage 3 – 134

QUALIFYING, PRACTICE, AND ENTRY INFORMATION

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Video of ‘bizarre mutant’ 4-foot fish in NC lake ignites debate about authenticity | Charlotte Observer

The lakes of Gaston County, North Carolina, have been invaded by a fluorescent-looking "mutant creature," if you believe video that appeared last week on YouTube.

It was posted by a conspiracy theorist channel known for hosting videos of alleged aliens, Bigfoot and "sky serpents."

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The YouTube Channel Disclose Screen says it was filmed April 10 in a 3.5-acre Gaston County lake by someone named Paula Terrell, who is asking for help identifying the fish. "It’s something they’ve never seen before," says a voice over in the video.

Other media outlets have since picked up on the video, including the Daily Star of the United Kingdom and LiveTechInfo.com, all of which are questioning what the creature might be, if not a fish.

"Bizarre 4ft mutant creature spotted in North Carolina lake leaves witnesses baffled," says the headline in the Daily Star.

The footage shows the bluish-colored thing floating close to the surface of water for several minutes, which some see as the first red flag.

Commenters on the internet have guessed it might be anything from a type of a koi to a remote control toy submarine with fake skin wrapped around it. One person suggests it was a dead peacock.

"That is sooo weird. At first it looked like a plastic bag, but when you zoomed in I could see it was a strange looking creature. Do you think someone may have had it in a tank and it survived being flushed," asked YouTube commenter Joanne B.

"Okay, while the folks here in Gaston County haven’t put any rockets into orbit lately, we ARE advanced enough that we don’t flush our toilets into local waterways, ponds, lakes or rivers," responded Jon Patterson, presumably a Gaston County resident. "Like some of the other YouTubers, I also think it is some variety of carp, but how it ended up that color is beyond me. "

"Seen a lotta fake (stuff) on YouTube, but dam this deserves an award," posted Jim Glenn.

It’s not be the first "mutant fish" reported in the Carolinas.

In June, photos of a grotesquely deformed fish posted on Facebook prompted an investigation by the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, which wanted to know what lake the fish came from and what was wrong with it.

Department officials reposted the photo on their Twitter page in response to growing questions from the public. It is believed the fish came from Lake Cherokee in Cherokee County, a fishing spot that is open to the public and widely used.

State biologists have yet to explain the fish’s appearance, but suspected it might be suffering from tumors.

Folklore also has it that a giant creature lives in the waters of Lake Norman, north of Charlotte. It’s called Normie and is rumored to resemble the Loch Ness monster.

Mark Price: 704-358-5245, @markprice_obs

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Why Charlotte and Raleigh Work for Black Residents

Racial disparities are always going to crop up as an important issue when considering the economic health of an American city. Whether it’s a world-class metropolis like Chicago, a successful midsize city like Minneapolis or Pittsburgh, or a struggling Rust Belt town like Cleveland or Milwaukee, stories about wages and investment and development and business conditions are almost always tempered by a reminder that African-American residents fail to share equally in whatever prosperity the region generates. Neighborhood segregation is rife, with black residents often forced to endure poor or nonexistent social services, unhealthy environmental conditions, deteriorating infrastructure and high crime rates.

While these problems are to be found in every large American city, some cities do a lot better than others. Atlanta and Washington are especially well-known as cities where black Americans can prosper. In both places, black Americans have relatively high median incomes, home and business ownership rates, while both have seen homicides decline by about 75 percent during the last three decades. Additionally, cities in Texas, with their cheap housing and growing economies, score highly.

But there’s something special about North Carolina. Its two biggest cities, Charlotte and Raleigh, have quietly succeeded in doing relatively well by their black residents. Raleigh especially stands out.

Nationally, the median African-American household income is $38,555 — about one-third less than the median for all Americans. In Charlotte and Raleigh, however, black household income is higher than in most other big cities, with Raleigh doing especially well. Here are the two cities’ positions in Forbes’ list of the 10 cities where black Americans are doing the best economically:

Where the Good Life Is

Median income for black households

Source: Forbes

Of course, costs matter too. Adjusting for the typical rent of a one-bedroom apartment, Charlotte climbs a couple of spots in the rankings:

Affordable City Living

Median income for black households relative to median annual rent for one-bedroom apartment

Source: Forbes

Black homeownership rates are also decent, at 41.6 percent in Charlotte and 41.3 percent in Raleigh. Both cities still have considerable black-white income gaps, so this success should be seen in relative terms.

Raleigh and Charlotte are also both known as meccas for black entrepreneurs. Black Enterprise recently declared Raleigh “the startup capital of the South,” with a booming venture capital presence. American Underground, a Google-affiliated organization dedicated to helping connect entrepreneurs, is located in Durham, in the Raleigh metropolitan area; 22.4 percent of its startups are minority-owned. Meanwhile, Charlotte, with more than 13,000 black-owned businesses, has worked hard to promote the trend, and organizations such as BLKTECH Interactive are helping.

Finally, it’s important to note that the attractiveness of North Carolina’s big cities goes beyond simple economics. Both are safe cities as well, with murder rates considerably lower than those of Chicago, Philadelphia or Baltimore. Raleigh has an especially low level of violence:

One More Thing to Like

Murder rate per 100,000 of population

Source: Brennan Center for Justice, author’s calculations

Since black Americans often bear the brunt of local violence, this means that Raleigh and Charlotte are places where African-American children can grow up in a healthy environment.

How did North Carolina’s cities accomplish this feat? One obvious answer is integration. Both Charlotte and Raleigh score relatively well on measures of neighborhood diversity — surprisingly, considerably ahead of both Washington and Atlanta. Even a casual glance at racial dot maps of American cities shows plenty of areas in Raleigh and neighboring Durham that feature a mix of dots. The number of “intensely segregated” schools in Raleigh remains quite low, though the Republican Party has tried to fight this trend. Charlotte, meanwhile, has even less neighborhood segregation than Raleigh. That doesn’t mean racial tensions are nonexistent, of course — far from it. But when white residents aren’t separated from black residents, it makes it harder to ignore the needs of the latter.

Institutions are another factor. The Carolina Small Business Development Fund has partnered with historically black Shaw University in Raleigh, and created a fund for African-American innovators and provided other support in Charlotte.

Meanwhile, both cities have booming economies. Charlotte, a banking hub, has experienced some of the nation’s fastest job growth, and Raleigh’s metropolitan area is emerging as one of the country’s top technology clusters. Economic growth helps fill government coffers with tax revenue that can then be used to create quality infrastructure, affordable housing, social services, good schools and business-development initiatives.

The attractiveness of Raleigh and Charlotte for black Americans is no secret. Rising numbers of black Americans are moving to the South, and the state of North Carolina has been one of the biggest beneficiaries. But these two cities, even in combination with places like Atlanta, Washington and Houston, can only do so much. To really improve life for black Americans, other cities should copy the successful approach of Raleigh and Charlotte — more integration, healthy economies and active support for black-owned businesses. That won’t solve all the problems experienced by black Americans, but it certainly wouldn’t hurt.

(Corrects seventh paragraph of article published March 27 to remove reference to nonprofit status of BLKTECH Interactive.)

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.

To contact the author of this story:
Noah Smith at nsmith150@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story:
James Greiff at jgreiff@bloomberg.net

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Noah Smith: Why Charlotte and Raleigh work for black residents

Racial disparities are always going to crop up as an important issue when considering the economic health of an American city. Whether it’s a world-class metropolis like Chicago, a successful midsize city like Minneapolis or Pittsburgh, or a struggling Rust Belt town like Cleveland or Milwaukee, stories about wages and investment and development and business conditions are almost always tempered by a reminder that African-American residents fail to share equally in whatever prosperity the region generates. Neighborhood segregation is rife, with black residents often forced to endure poor or nonexistent social services, unhealthy environmental conditions, deteriorating infrastructure and high crime rates.

While these problems are to be found in every large American city, some cities do a lot better than others. Atlanta and Washington are especially well-known as cities where black Americans can prosper. In both places, black Americans have relatively high median incomes, home and business ownership rates, while both have seen homicides decline by about 75 percent during the last three decades. Additionally, cities in Texas, with their cheap housing and growing economies, score highly.

But there’s something special about North Carolina. Its two biggest cities, Charlotte and Raleigh, have quietly succeeded in doing relatively well by their black residents. Raleigh especially stands out.

Nationally, the median African-American household income is $38,555 — about one-third less than the median for all Americans. In Charlotte and Raleigh, however, black household income is higher than in most other big cities, with Raleigh doing especially well.

Black homeownership rates are also decent, at 41.6 percent in Charlotte and 41.3 percent in Raleigh. Both cities still have considerable black-white income gaps, so this success should be seen in relative terms.

Raleigh and Charlotte are also both known as meccas for black entrepreneurs. Black Enterprise recently declared Raleigh "the startup capital of the South," with a booming venture capital presence. American Underground, a Google-affiliated organization dedicated to helping connect entrepreneurs, is located in Durham, in the Raleigh metropolitan area; 22.4 percent of its startups are minority-owned. Meanwhile, Charlotte, with more than 13,000 black-owned businesses, has worked hard to promote the trend, and nonprofits like BLKTECH Interactive are helping.

Finally, it’s important to note that the attractiveness of North Carolina’s big cities goes beyond simple economics. Both are safe cities as well, with murder rates considerably lower than those of Chicago, Philadelphia or Baltimore. Raleigh has an especially low level of violence.

Since black Americans often bear the brunt of local violence, this means that Raleigh and Charlotte are places where African-American children can grow up in a healthy environment.

How did North Carolina’s cities accomplish this feat? One obvious answer is integration. Both Charlotte and Raleigh score relatively well on measures of neighborhood diversity — surprisingly, considerably ahead of both Washington and Atlanta. Even a casual glance at racial dot maps of American cities shows plenty of areas in Raleigh and neighboring Durham that feature a mix of dots. The number of "intensely segregated" schools in Raleigh remains quite low, though the Republican Party has tried to fight this trend. Charlotte, meanwhile, has even less neighborhood segregation than Raleigh. That doesn’t mean racial tensions are nonexistent, of course — far from it. But when white residents aren’t separated from black residents, it makes it harder to ignore the needs of the latter.

Institutions are another factor. The Carolina Small Business Development Fund has partnered with historically black Shaw University in Raleigh, and created a fund for African-American innovators and provided other support in Charlotte.

Meanwhile, both cities have booming economies. Charlotte, a banking hub, has experienced some of the nation’s fastest job growth, and Raleigh’s metropolitan area is emerging as one of the country’s top technology clusters. Economic growth helps fill government coffers with tax revenue that can then be used to create quality infrastructure, affordable housing, social services, good schools and business-development initiatives.

The attractiveness of Raleigh and Charlotte for black Americans is no secret. Rising numbers of black Americans are moving to the South, and the state of North Carolina has been one of the biggest beneficiaries. But these two cities, even in combination with places like Atlanta, Washington and Houston, can only do so much. To really improve life for black Americans, other cities should copy the successful approach of Raleigh and Charlotte — more integration, healthy economies and active support for black-owned businesses. That won’t solve all the problems experienced by black Americans, but it certainly wouldn’t hurt.

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A Week In Charlotte, NC, On A $68,250 Salary

Welcome to Money Diaries, where we’re tackling what might be the last taboo facing modern working women: money. We’re asking millennials how they spend their hard-earned money during a seven-day period — and we’re tracking every last dollar.

Occupation: Associate Marketer
Industry: Marketing
Age: 25
Location: Charlotte, NC
Salary: $68,250
Paycheck (2x/month): $2,028

Monthly Expenses
Rent: $1,181, which includes pet rent, hot water, and valet trash pick-up
Student Loan Payment: $200
Cell Phone: ~$80. (I’m still on the family plan, so I Venmo my dad each month.)
401k: I contribute 4% pre-tax and my company matches up to 3%.
Savings: Anything I don’t spend goes to savings, so I try to put in between $500 and $1,000 each month.
Health Insurance: $0. (I’m still on my mother’s plan for now! I will have to get my own this year though.)
Internet: $70
Netflix: $11.76
Hulu: $12.81
Spotify: $15.99. (I have a family plan and pay for my sister’s account.)
Electricity: $40
The New York Times Subscription: $15

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7 a.m. — I roll out of bed and jump in the shower. I try to get ready for the day as quickly as possible, though I have the tendency to waste time when I’m still drowsy in the morning. Despite the fact that it takes me only 15 minutes to shower and then force mascara onto my eyelashes, my morning routine is often slowed down by my feeding the cat, drinking water, staring into space, etc. I glance at the clock and rush to gather my things for work.

10 a.m. — I grab a coffee ($1) and pretend to work for two hours while waiting for Firefly Festival tickets to become available. Then I quickly work my way through the site to buy two tickets for my best friend and me ($299 each) and a tent for four ($290 per person). My friends and I decided to splurge on glamping so that we can get the festival experience but still be able to shower. My friends pay me back right away on Venmo for the festival ticket and most of the tent cost, but it feels weird to spend so much money on a concert happening five months from now! $590

12 p.m. — I order lunch for the team today and put the catering on my card (triple points!), but will be reimbursed for the total. ($305 expensed)

3 p.m. — We have a call with our partner to discuss what my team has been working on over the past few weeks. I work in digital marketing, and my company partners with larger firms to handle their search and on-site strategy. I always appreciate the opportunity to give my team members credit in front of the partners.

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6 p.m. — I finally leave the office and rush home to reunite with my couch. My sister invites me out with some of her friends, but I don’t have the energy. I don’t think I’m in the mood to spend time with Trump supporters, which I know is probably petty and immature.

9:30 a.m. — I sleep in later than usual for a Saturday and play with my cat for a while. He’s almost two but very much acts like a kitten with his clumsy pouncing. I never thought I would be a cat person but he’s pretty perfect.

10:30 a.m. — I head to a workout with my sister. My mother recently got us a package of training session; we could never afford a personal trainer on our own, so I’ll be sad when the training is over! We grab Starbucks after the workout to reward ourselves for being active. $3.19

12:30 p.m. — I realize I haven’t deep-cleaned my apartment in a while. The bathroom could use work, and since I’m already dirty from my workout, I dive into the tub with tile cleaner in hand.

2 p.m. — After I finish cleaning, I bath in my newly sparkling bathroom. I wander into the kitchen to make coffee and decide to be ambitious and make crepes. I’ve always enjoyed cooking and baking but I rarely have time for either. I stuff the crepes full of chocolate chips along with almond butter and jam.

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6 p.m. — All my spending yesterday coupled with my lack of motivation to be social tonight results in another weekend night on the couch. It was a stressful week at work, and I look forward to spending quality time with Netflix.

9 a.m. — I wake up to a slew of emails and chat notifications from my team and realize I have to work today. Working weekends is never fun, but it happens more often than not.

11 a.m. — I drink coffee and snack on paleo tea cookies while I work. I’m definitely not going paleo, but when I bake any kind of treat I try to make sure it has some nutritional value.

2 p.m. — I take a break from working to run to the grocery store. (I only have supplies for cookies right now, and those won’t exactly get me through the week.) I stock up on frozen fruit, vegetables, plantain chips, coconut yogurt, ground chicken, and miscellaneous other items. I’m thinking I’ll make buffalo chicken meatballs for dinner this week. $111.48

3 p.m. — I keep working while I begin prepping my food for the week. I’m excited to start cooking again! I whip up black bean brownies (not good), chicken meatballs (good), and protein donuts for breakfast (healthy and delicious). Feeling like a productive health goddess, I polish off my tea cookies in celebration.

8 p.m. — I’m essentially done working for the remainder of the evening, so I peruse Amazon for any items I might need. Although I know I have the tendency to shop online out of boredom, I stock up on a few things for my upcoming trip to South America. I purchase a few necessities along with my SPF 110 facial sunscreen. I’m a firm believer in sunscreen and I take it a bit overboard when it comes to my face and neck. $33.21

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10 p.m. — I go to bed feeling relaxed and prepared for the week ahead. Then I remember that our performance reviews are this week, and I toss and turn all night.

7:20 a.m. — I snooze my alarm for no less than 45 minutes and wake up feeling groggy and annoyed at myself for oversleeping. I try to rush through my morning routine, but my cat wants snuggles and I’m in a giving mood.

8:30 a.m. — The drive to work takes about 45 minutes because my office is in South Carolina and I’m not a very aggressive driver. I hurry into the office to buy a coffee ($1) and check my schedule for the day. $1

10 a.m. — I prepare for a team meeting regarding the week’s priorities and think through my to do-list. It’s shaping up to be a busy week, so it’s important that I have a tangible task idea of how to keep my priorities in order.

11:30 a.m. — I walk out of a meeting with my manager feeling frustrated, so I try to focus my attention on the other meetings I have later this afternoon. I’m trying to be a more positive person at the office.

12:30 p.m. — A coworker and I grab lunch in the café and work on our personal reviews. The review cycle is an awkward and stressful process, and I’ve never been comfortable with the idea of anonymous feedback. $2.50

7 p.m. — The remainder of the day flies by, and I walk out with a few friends from work. They invite me out to dinner but since I just spent a ton of money on groceries, we decide to eat in. They join me at my place and we eat and work on our annual reviews. I struggle through my self-assessment and realize I need to keep a list of what I accomplish throughout the year.

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7:20 a.m. — Wake up relatively late again and rush to work. I have a lot to get done today and probably should have gotten to the office earlier than usual. Once I’m in, I grab my coffee from the café and get to work. $1

10:45 a.m. — It’s my coworker’s birthday, so I pregame lunch with a donut. I’m not hungry yet, but after a packed morning of meetings and a slew of demanding emails, the donut really hits the spot.

4 p.m. — Because of all my meetings today, I have trouble fitting in any time to do real work. My longer-term projects need attention, and I put off a few requests from my manager. I grab a banana with peanut butter and a seltzer and get to work. $1.50

7 p.m. — I stop for gas on my way home from work ($25.41) and swing by CVS to pick up hair dye ($10.71). I had horrible luck at a salon last month, and the root area of my hair is becoming weirdly orange. I grab an ash brown color and hope for the best. $36.12

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8:30 p.m. — The dye essentially makes no difference except that I think my roots look even lighter. I don’t have the energy to care enough to fix it tonight, so I trim the ends and deep condition to feel marginally better about the unnecessary damage I just caused.

7:30 a.m. — SNOW DAY! Charlotte rarely gets snow and the city is not prepared with enough salt trucks or snow plows. The roads get pretty icy and three inches of snow can actually debilitate the city. With that in mind, I decide to work from home.

9 a.m. — I make a big pot of coffee and eat a leftover crepe with almond butter and jam from the weekend. I feel full but continue to eat whatever snacks I can find throughout the morning.

12 p.m. — Work was insane this morning since most people either didn’t show up to the office or are leaving early. Most of the problem-solving is up to me, so this snow day is shaping up to be very busy.

6 p.m. — My training session is canceled due to the weather tonight, which is a bummer because I missed the last session too. Feeling lethargic and lazy, I head downstairs to the gym for a quick run. I’m not much of a runner, but I have pipe dreams of becoming someone who wakes up to run before work each morning. An evening on the elliptical for 30 minutes is close enough for now.

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7 p.m. — I throw a load of laundry into the washer while I heat up dinner and open a bottle of wine. One of the perks of living in Charlotte is that almost all apartment complexes come with an in-unit washer and dryer. This is definitely something I could have used when I worked in New York, and I’m sure I will miss it whenever I leave Charlotte.

8:30 p.m. — I need to purchase my flights for my brother’s fiancée’s bachelorette party. I’m really excited to visit New Orleans for the first time. Party, here I come! $316

9:30 p.m. — Exhausted from sitting on the couch all day, I drag my lazy body to bed. The few inches of snow really make the courtyard outside my window look beautiful.

6:45 a.m. — I wake up easily thanks to my early bedtime, and jump in the shower. I pack my protein donut and the remains of my chicken meatballs in my bag before I leave.

8 a.m. — I grab a coffee from the café and finish up some of the reports I didn’t get around to yesterday. My day is pretty light on meetings and I’m excited to spend some time doing legitimate work. $1

12 p.m. — Since I packed my lunch today, I have no real need to go to the café, but I can use the walk and a seltzer. I grab two and take my time getting back to my desk. I expected a more dramatic day today after the snow day, but it’s shaping up to be pretty calm. $1

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3 p.m. — I present the progress my team has made this month to the broader marketing team, and everyone seems excited about what we have in the works. We have lofty goals but I feel confident that we can hit and exceed them. I walk back to my desk, proud of my team and eager to get to work.

6 p.m. — I’m dog-sitting this weekend and tonight is the first night! I’m staying at the owner’s house, so I head straight there after work to let the dogs outside. I’ve always wanted to own a dog but they’re high maintenance and expensive to board. With all the traveling I do, it just doesn’t make sense for me to adopt one right now. Luckily, I have my very low-maintenance cat.

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Posted in Charlotte NC

Expect Traffic in Charlotte With Billy Graham Funeral and CIAA Tourney: AAA

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — AAA Carolinas says drivers should expect traffic delays in the Charlotte area this week due to Reverend Billy Graham’s funeral and the CIAA basketball tournament.

Related: NC Lt. Governor Wants Graham Statue to Replace Aycock’s at U.S. Capitol

Graham’s funeral is Friday at the Billy Graham Library and closed to the public, but an estimated 2,300 guests are expected including President Donald Trump. The funeral begins at noon and will last about 90 minutes.

AAA says presidential visits can cause traffic problems like road closures and delays. If you’re headed to Charlotte-Douglas Airport, give yourself some extra drive time especially on Friday. Continue reading “Expect Traffic in Charlotte With Billy Graham Funeral and CIAA Tourney: AAA”

Posted in Charlotte NC

ICYMI: Congrats, Charlotte. Your Commute Is Among The Worst In US

CHARLOTTE, NC — Every driver in the Charlotte-metro area knows that the commutes can be awful in the Queen City region. If you’re a driver in the United States, you’re probably intimately familiar with what traffic jams look like, or at least more so than the rest of the developed world. That’s because American drivers spend on average about 41 hours — roughly a whole work week — staring at someone else’s bumper because they’re stuck in traffic, according to a new report by the analytics company INRIX.

That horrid shared experience of inching along on the roadway and braking every few feet cost the United States more than $300 billion last year — an amount roughly the size of Singapore’s whole economy. Charlotte ranked 54th in the United States and 358th in the world for traffic congestion, with each driver spending on average 23 hours a week at peak periods tied up in traffic last year. Continue reading “ICYMI: Congrats, Charlotte. Your Commute Is Among The Worst In US”

Posted in Charlotte NC

White Lodging will expand its portfolio to 20th state with addition of new development at Ally Charlotte Center in North Carolina

The premium-branded, full-service hotel will highlight the company’s innovative take on urban hotels

MERRILLVILLE, Ind., Jan. 24, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Plans to expand its portfolio to North Carolina with a new, full-service hotel in Uptown Charlotte were announced today by White Lodging along with Crescent Communities, the real estate company responsible for building the Ally Charlotte Center mixed used development. The hotel will be complete and open for business in early 2021. Continue reading “White Lodging will expand its portfolio to 20th state with addition of new development at Ally Charlotte Center in North Carolina”

Posted in Charlotte NC

The Panthers are worth public money. But let’s figure out now what we’re willing to offer

There’s plenty of debate over whether public subsidies of professional sports are worth it. Economists generally agree that the costs to taxpayers outweigh the benefits of all the additional spending on construction, hotels, restaurants, tickets and concessions.

And yet, cities keep ponying up to build stadiums — some $12 billion worth between 2000 and 2015.

In 2013, the city of Charlotte approved an $87.5 million plan to help renovate Bank of America Stadium in exchange for a six-year guarantee that the Panthers would not move. A year later, Charlotte rejected a proposal to pump in $50 million more for four more years.

Continue reading “The Panthers are worth public money. But let’s figure out now what we’re willing to offer”